Wind Symphony Concert

March 5, 2019

 

The Ohio State University
WIND SYMPHONY
Russel C. Mikkelson, conductor
Alexander Gonzales, guest conductor
Katherine Borst Jones, flute
 

8 p.m. • Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Weigel Auditorium

1866 College Rd
Columbus, OH
 

PROGRAM


Roaring Fork

Eric Ewazen (b. 1954)
I. Whitewater Rapids (Maroon Creek)

The Diavola Quintet:
Alex Goad, flute; Hilary Hobbs, oboe; Gaby Valladares, clarinet; Anna Dorey, horn; Maxwell Zywica, bassoon

Mångata

Kyle Krause (b. 1991)

Amelia DuPlain, Hannah Moore, Clay Schneider, Lucas Fox, percussion

Roulade

Maurice C. Whitney (1909–1984)

Logan Howe, Mikey Blaha, Noah Wise, Nathan Murta, clarinets

Recitation Book for Saxophone Quartet

David Maslanka (1943–2017)

1. Broken Heart: Meditation on the chorale melody Der du bist drei in Einigkeit

Hyperion Quartet:
Frankie Wantuch, Michael Weintraub, Nick Young, Scott Snyder

Benediction

John Stevens (b. 1951)

Sean O’Brien, Alexander Gonzalez, euphoniums
Austin Crumrine, Bennett Deshotels, tubas

—INTERVAL—

Fantasia and Fugue in C minor

J. S. Bach (1685–1750)
arr. Edward Elgar
transcription by Ryan Nowlin

Alexander Gonzales, guest conductor

The Shadow of Sirius

Joel Puckett (b. 1977)

The Nomad Flute
Eye of Shadow
Into the Clouds

Katherine Borst Jones, flute

American Overture for Band

Joseph Willcox Jenkins (1928–2014)
 


NOTES


FANTASIA AND FUGUE IN C MINOR
J. S. Bach / arr. Edward Elgar
transcription by Ryan Nowlin

The many great organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach have been transcribed for countless instrumental ensembles in the two and a half centuries since his death. Some of the transcriptions made of Bach’s works reimagine the notes by employing the fullest range of colors available through the instruments of the ensemble. British luminary Edward Elgar was in that category when he set upon transcribing Bach’s Fantasia and Fugue in C minor for orchestra in 1922.

Bach likely composed the Fantasia and Fugue in C minor during one of his two tenures as organist in the small town of Weimar in what is now present-day Germany The composition of the Fantasia and Fugue possibly came toward the end of his tenure in Weimar, but recent scholarship also leaves open the possibility that it was composed a bit later — in 1723, around the time of Bach’s completion of his famous keyboard cycle The Well-Tempered Klavier. Although the Fantasia and Fugue was composed for organ, it departs in style from many of his other major organ works. Rather than featuring a free and rhapsodic introduction, like the D minor Toccata, the Fantasia is notably restrained, with an unmistakable lyricism and vocal quality. The fugue is also significantly more scalar and melismatic than many of Bach’s other instrumental fugues. Although Bach did not write many choral fugues, this one is structured in such a way that it could easily be imagined as music sung by a choir. The combination of these elements sets the Fantasia and Fugue in C minor apart from much of his more virtuosic organ music and places it more expressively in line with the remarkable vocal music he composed during his lifetime.

In 1920, Elgar met with German composer Richard Strauss to talk about working to heal the international rift caused by the First World War. The two composers had been casual friends for many years, and discussed an idea to collaborate on a new transcription for orchestra of Bach’s Fantasia and Fugue in C minor; Strauss would set the Fantasia and Elgar the Fugue. Elgar completed his portion the following year, but Strauss did not follow through with his part of the project. Rather than discard his work, Elgar completed the Fantasia himself, and the new arrangement was premiered to great acclaim in 1922 at the Three Choirs Festival in Gloucester, England.

THE SHADOW OF SIRIUS
Joel Puckett

The Nomad Flute Eye of Shadow Into the Clouds

The composer writes:

"I have always found comfort in poetry. While in school, I was the guy with a collection of Bukowski under one arm and a collection of Yeats under the other. I have always enjoyed the rhythm of other people’s thoughts and feelings. In the winter of 2009, my wife and I experienced a heartbreak that left me unsure of how to even breathe, let alone grieve. On March 1, 2009, I found a copy of W. S. Merwin’s The Shadow of Sirius, and I began to feel myself heal. I have almost no idea what most of this poetry means. But I know that it fills me with a profound sadness that is, at the same time, brimming with hope.

I recently heard Mr. Merwin discussing the origin of the title of his collection. He related that scientists have discovered that the star known as Sirius is actually a star system. What looks to our eye like a single object is actually many. Merwin found himself wondering what is on the other side of Sirius, lying in its shadow.

A friend once said to me, 'many concerti explore a virtuosity of technique but not many explore a virtuosity of expression.' It was with that thought in mind that I began work on my The Shadow of Sirius, for solo flute and wind orchestra."

AMERICAN OVERTURE FOR BAND
Joseph Willcox Jenkins

American Overture for Band was written while Jenkins served as the Army Field Band’s arranger. A 50th Anniversary version was published in collaboration with Jenkins, updating the original score to include revisions to dynamics, articulations and pitches. The work became Jenkins’ most successful; he stated that he would be “hard-pressed to duplicate its success.” The work features demanding horn lines, soaring above busy rhythmic motifs and counter-lines. The bright, bold character of American Overture for Band is musically representative of just that: America. The melody flies between sections in the ensemble, bouncing around excitedly, at one moment sitting atop the band’s sound in a majestic horn unison, and in the very next playfully echoed by the cornets. The woodwinds add their playful countermelodies, all while the trombones and euphoniums interject the crisp metric motif that is found in the percussion section, driving this work from its joyous start to its frantically exuberant close. — Note by the United States Marine Band


Wind Symphony

Russel C. Mikkelson, conductor


PICCOLO
Peyton Sandri

FLUTE
Daniel Zipin *
Kayla Bradley
Alex Goad
Grace Forrai
Nicole Conte

OBOE
Michael Rueda *
Hilary Hobbs
Esther Krumm
Suzanne Jennison

ENGLISH HORN
Suzanne Jennison

BASSOON
Ian Bell *
Nate Centa
Maxx Zywica

CONTRABASSOON
Maxx Zywica

E-flat CLARINET
Cosmos Fristachi

CLARINET
Alyssa Powell *
David Robinson
Sarah Korneisel Jaegers
Nathan Murta
Logan Howe
Gabrielle Valladares
Mikey Blaha
Noah Wise

BASS CLARINET
Austin Suarez

CONTRABASS CLARINET
Sarah Korneisel Jaegers

ALTO SAXOPHONE
Michael Weintraub *
Francesca Wantuch

TENOR SAXOPHONE
Nick Young

BARITONE SAXOPHONE
Logan Wright

HORN
Benjamin Hottensmith *
Leo Steinkerchner
Greg Eberwine
Cameron Reed
Anna Dorey
Amanda Midkiff

TRUMPET
Brooklynn Howell *
Daniel Brinker
Sara Loney
Justin Boucher-Foley
Heather Johnson
Kaity Catalfina
Vanessa Rivera

TROMBONE
Peter Gooch *
Jake Pauley
Jacob Chestnut

BASS TROMBONE
Parker Baird

EUPHONIUM
Sean O’Brien *
Seth Champion
Grant Booth

TUBA
Austin Crumrine *
Bennett Deshotels
Jocelyn Smallwood

PERCUSSION
Amelia DuPlain *
Clay Schneider
Ben Shaheen
Sarah Nichols
Lucas Fox
Michael Mayer

DOUBLE BASS
Nicholas Young

PIANO
Yingzhou Hu

HARP
Nathan Hay

* indicates principal


Band Department Personnel


Russel C. Mikkelson, director of bands
Scott A. Jones, associate director of bands
Christopher D. Hoch, associate director of bands; director, marching and athletic bands
Phillip A. Day, assistant director of bands; associate director, marching and athletic bands
David Hedgecoth, co-conductor, Collegiate Winds
Michael Smith, assistant director, marching and athletic bands
Christopher Dent, band office associate

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS

Onsby C. Rose, doctoral conducting associate
Brent Levine, doctoral conducting associate
Alexander Gonzalez, doctoral conducting associate
Joe Carver, doctoral teaching associate
Michael Weintraub, master’s conducting associate

School of Music ​Instrumental Faculty


Katherine Borst Jones, flute
Robert Sorton, oboe
Karen Pierson, bassoon
Caroline Hartig, clarinet
Michael Rene Torres, saxophone
Timothy Leasure, trumpet
Bruce Henniss, horn
John Gruber, trombone
James Akins, euphonium and tuba
Barry Green, double bass
Susan Powell, percussion
Steven Glaser, piano
Caroline Hong, piano
Jeanne Norton, harp


Join us…


School of Music performances are free, except for a few premium events.

42nd ANNUAL JAZZ FESTIVAL

A five-day festival celebrating America's musical art form
March 20–24

OUTREACH EVENTS
Details at music.osu.edu/outreach

Spring Visit Day • April 5
Double Reed Honors Invitational • April 13
Central Ohio Flute Association Festival • April 6
Piano Day • May 11
Youth Summer Music Programs • June–July

Visit music.osu.edu/events

 

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